The power of the Kenyan sun by Salima Visram
Jun16

The power of the Kenyan sun by Salima Visram

Toronto, Canada AreaInternational Trade and Development
Current Founder & CEO at The Soular Backpack, Teaching Assistant for Social Context of Business Course at McGill University
Education McGill University, UWC Atlantic College, Aga Khan Academy, Mombasa

Read More
Day of the African child 2018: Leave no child behind for Africa’s development.
Jun15

Day of the African child 2018: Leave no child behind for Africa’s development.

Every year we celebrate this day and remember the children of the Soweto. The student uprising was for the basic right of education. Today all the great state so been made the statistics are shockingly poor and there’s still a lot to do. Despite the millennium development goals and sustainable development goals they still many challenges that are yet to be overcome.

Read More
Day Of The Girl Child 2017
Oct11

Day Of The Girl Child 2017

EmPower girls before, during and after crisis.

Read More
A Warrior’s cry against Child marriage by Memory Banda
Aug31

A Warrior’s cry against Child marriage by Memory Banda

Memory Banda

At 18, I was most concerned with getting the latest Iphone. Memory Banda on the other hand, successfully influenced the Malawi parliament to raise the legal marriage from 15 to 18. After watching her sister get pregnant at 11, Memory vowed to defy the traditional practice of kusasafumbi, a practice in which young girls are forced into marriage once they begin menstruation.

Now an avid girl’s rights activist, Memory shows a glimpse of her strength and resilience in this passionate speech about girls right to choose at the TEDWomen 2015 conference.

Read More
Being the real me without apology by Maame Yaa Boafo
Aug10

Being the real me without apology by Maame Yaa Boafo

Although Nollywood has established itself as an industry to be reckoned with in Africa, many African parents are still unlikely to be thrilled with a child actively choosing acting as a desired profession. MaameYaa Baofo, a New-York based Ghanaian actress, is also gifted orator. MaameYaa Boafo was born in Pakistan and hails from Ghana, West Africa and currently lives in New York. Coming to the United States to obtain a double Bachelor degree in Journalism and French at Hood College, Ms. Boafo was then awarded the Levin Scholarship from Rutgers University where she received her MFA in Acting from the Mason Gross School of the Arts. She has since gone on to play roles such as Ophelia in Hamlet, the Courtesan in Comedy of Errors and made her off-Broadway debut as Walter Mosley’s leading lady in his play LIFT.
In this talk, she uses her experience of pursuing acting despite discouragement from others to discuss the importance of being your authentic self without apology.

Read More